Tag Archive | Alternative Schools of Thought

Historiography and Comparison

This selection of readings proposes some interesting questions about comparison, history, and the construction of knowledge within and across various academic fields (e.g. rhetorical studies, philosophy, history, etc.) that can be, or have been, naturalized to the point of invisibility. These articles attempt to tease apart and make visible the hidden assumptions within methodologies and […]

Adversaries and Authorities

Purely uncritical moment: This was an amazing book. I appreciate how Lloyd enacts his comparison between Chinese and Greek science by addressing what are surface or “apparent” differences and then complicating that with details that may go against the common assumptions. It reminded me of the argument by Hall and Ames in Anticipating China, as […]

Molecules, Neorons, and Paradox: The Applicaiton of Daoist Rhetoric to Everyday Life

I appreciate the effort by Steven Combs to apply the ideas of Daoism to rhetoric, offering a very readable, easy to follow overview and application for examining texts through this lens. While there are surely things that I could critique, I prefer to focus on some aspects of this text that I found particularly useful […]

Kennedy’s Comparative Rhetoric

The basic function of rhetorical communication is defensive and conservative…the major function of rhetoric throughout most of human history in most of the world has been to preserve things as they are or to try to recover an idealized happier past” (Kennedy 216). While there are several of Kennedy’s claims that I could choose to […]

Many Things Are Holographic….

The ten thousand things – nothing exists from its own side – all is interdependent and perpetually fluctuating – impermanence is the only permanent state – there is no transcendent subject or object – there is no ultimate distinction between subject/object and yet all and every are distinct – and all are one whole that […]

The Value of the Vague

The point is simply that the usefulness, appropriateness, and fit of these terms should always be in question and should never be assumed, and that their application must always bear a burden of proof when applied outside their original cultural contexts” (Garrett 54). Garrett’s chapter about the issues of applying various Westernized definitions to “rhetoric” […]

Problematics and Representation

“Rituals of speaking are politically constituted by power relations of domination, exploitation, and subordination. Who is speaking, who is spoken of, and who listens is a result, as well as an act, of political struggle (Alcoff 15). “A form of first problematic thinking, while recessive in the West, dominates classical Chinese culture. Likewise, the cultural […]