Tag Archive | Rhetorical History

NonEuroAmerican Rhetorics – Methodologies and Studies

The text distills the drama of human condition into an image of a naked, newborn body about to be captured by words. On stage are the midwives, hands bloodied and minds occupied with the medical necessities and cultural imperatives associated with childbirth; off stage and narrating are the voyeuristic and education- minded friars documenting and […]

Adversaries and Authorities

Purely uncritical moment: This was an amazing book. I appreciate how Lloyd enacts his comparison between Chinese and Greek science by addressing what are surface or “apparent” differences and then complicating that with details that may go against the common assumptions. It reminded me of the argument by Hall and Ames in Anticipating China, as […]

The Rhetoric of Way-Making

Thinking about the rhetoric of the Dao as well as the idea of discursive fields or constellations of meaning, I found myself pulling out words that clustered around concepts, inter-linked and interdependent. This (somewhat) pictorially represents my thinking about those terms as central and peripheral terms in relationship to the meanings of the text. So […]

The Glib, the Eloquent, and the Appropriate

There are many ways that I could approach The Analects of Confucius but given that we have been speaking of rhetorics cross-culturally and that I have read different analyses of this text as either supporting or condemning (at least some definitions of) rhetoric, I found myself paying particular attention to aspects of this text that […]

Problematics and Representation

“Rituals of speaking are politically constituted by power relations of domination, exploitation, and subordination. Who is speaking, who is spoken of, and who listens is a result, as well as an act, of political struggle (Alcoff 15). “A form of first problematic thinking, while recessive in the West, dominates classical Chinese culture. Likewise, the cultural […]

Confucius, Eloquence, and Rhetoric

Verbal eloquence was not valorized by classical Chinese thinkers, and on the contrary the views found in their texts reveal a general mistrust of it, a sentiment common to almost all major school of thought despite their fundamental philosophical differences, but it is most conspicuously and extensively reflected in Confucian texts (Xu 115). Though all […]

Revisions and Histories

Possibly because I research nineteenth and early twentieth-century composition, or maybe because I’ve taken multiple historic-perspective composition and/or rhetoric graduate level classes (about five), or even because James Berlin was on the reading list for my Master’s exam, I feel like I’ve read “The History of Composition in America” from various perspectives about a hundred […]